New Course in NYC: Anthropology and Ethnographic Theory starts Nov 21

Developed as a tool for colonial empire-building at the close of the 19th century, the ethnographic method has emerged in the late 20th and early 21st centuries as an important practice for telling the stories of the oppressed and demanding social change. How did this transformation take place, and what does it mean for the future of how human societies study and understand themselves?

4S Panel Preview | Eating For Life: When Food Is the Best Medicine

Recent work in science studies has identified the use of “drugs for life” (Dumit 2012) – drugs which are necessary to sustain life and which also must be taken for the duration of life to have the desired effect – as a dominant trend in today’s biomedical toolkit. What has sometimes been overlooked are the everyday technologies of the self that coexist with these novel pharmaceutical regimens, like eating. The 4S panel, “Eating For Life: When Food Is the Best Medicine,” seeks to explore the intentional and incidental ways that dietary management is used to augment or stand in for pharmaceutical approaches to the maintenance of the human body.

New course: Drugs and Society starts October 19th in NYC

Informed by Marxist theory, feminism, and science studies, this class interrogates how drugs – both engineered pharmaceuticals and pleasurably addictive illegal substances – gain and reproduce their power in our social life. As total health expenditures approach 20% of American GDP, and drugs become dynamic components of everyday life, understanding the personal experience and political economy of these compounds is more crucial than ever.

Becoming Cyborg: Science and Science Fiction starts October 17th

Join me in Jersey City for the Brooklyn Institute’s first Jersey class at Word Bookstore!

Donna Haraway argues in her canonical essay, “A Manifesto For Cyborgs,” that to be a cyborg means to live in a world without tidy origin stories or innocent wholeness. Instead, it is about partial connections, complex kinship with humans, non-humans, and machines, and an acceptance of the messiness that it takes to get along better together. Using this formulation of cyborg theory as a jumping off point, this seminar will explore what it means to live in our modern world where myths of human-machine synthesis prefigure our attitudes toward technology and the future, the responsibility of humans toward non-humans and the environment, capitalist accumulation, and oppression based on gender, race, and class.

Donna Haraway Course Begins July 11 in Brooklyn

Over a career spanning four decades, philosopher of science Donna Haraway has revolutionized how social theorists and technoscience practitioners understand the situated objectivity of scientific knowledge, with special attention to the ways in which technoscience assigns biological meaning to social categories of gender. While Haraway is most famously associated with Cyborg Theory, this course will offer students an opportunity to survey the full scope of her oeuvre, including those works that draw on Marxist feminist theory, philosophy of science, and multispecies concerns.

The Politics of Infrastructure: Course Begins May 2

What does it take to build an infrastructural system? What kind of norms do infrastructures enforce, and what kinds of people do they allow to thrive? What happens when infrastructure starts to break down, or prove inadequate in the face of disaster? What do infrastructures teach us? And what kind of world do they make possible? This four-week seminar pulls back the curtain to reveal the people, processes, and values that shape the infrastructures of modern life, and how these systems simultaneously provide opportunities for and place constraints on social life.

Food as Medicine, or, What to Do When There’s No Treatment

Listening to my early research interviews can be fun. It can also be embarrassing.

For example, one question I asked in early interviews was: “What’s the treatment for food allergies?”

Now, I know that I should have asked, what medications do you use to manage food allergies? That’s what I was interested in: learning about what pills, injections, and other medical products people use to maintain their health while living with food allergies.

Call for Proposals: Pharmaceuticals Out of Bounds (4S 2016)

What happens when pharmaceuticals overflow the boundaries imposed by regulatory structures, carrier materials, and places and methods of production? What new risks–to bodies and environments–appear in an increasingly pharmaceuticalized world? What new social lives do drugs take on when used outside of their usage scripts, after expiration, or when they are cut, mixed, and remade into new types of drugs?

Imagining Immunity: Course Starts January 25

Through our investigation of the multiple lives of immunity, this class will explore how the strategic deployment of scientific knowledge and medico-technological practices animates a biopolitical understanding of society and embeds modern biomedicine in every aspect of social life.

Why Study Food Allergies? Allergies, Medicine, and Morality

In communities where deadly infectious childhood diseases have largely retreated, food allergies have taken their place as a medico-moral cause célèbre for mothers, medical workers, and medical researchers seeking ensure the safety of innocent children. Their mysterious etiology – a combination of environmental exposure, heredity, and individual biology – unpredictable development, apparently sudden increase, and potentially deadly effects make them a source of fear for parents worldwide.

Greetings from the Dissertation Life!

Since June, I’ve had a lot of projects on my plate – writing up my dissertation to meet firm deadlines for graduation this spring, joining the team of an allergy-focused biotechnology start-up company, joining the faculty of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research (and now launching my second 4-week course in NYC, Imagining Immunity), conferencing, and starting the post-PhD adjustment.

Earning a PhD in a Post-Academic World

This is a question I’ve been thinking about very deeply lately. The question in my life in 2015. I’m embarking on some new adventures this summer, all of which have grown out of my grad school experience and dissertation research. But what I’m putting together in my professional life doesn’t look like what a typical PhD student or young scholar would do. This is not exactly academic quit lit. Rather, this is a reflection on what it means to be a scholar, a professional, and a human who wants to have a good life.

Teachable Moments in Food Allergic Life

I spent the previous weekend in sunny California at the FARE National Food Allergy Conference. I met tons of great people – adults with food allergies, parents of food allergic kids, FARE staff, business owners, scientists, and others with a connection to the food allergy world. I also ate out a lot – and eating out with a crowd of food allergy-aware people leads to lots of teachable moments!